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Oct 04

October 2017 Exhibits: Shea Wilkinson “Scene From Above,” and Brian Weber Photographs

Shea Wilkinson’s free motion quilts are on view in the Tracy Gallery throughout October. An Artist’s Reception will be held on Friday, October 6th from 5-7pm. Ms. Wilkinson will also be the featured speaker at the 3rd Thursdy Luncheon on October 19th.

This series is called “Maps: New Discoveries,” which might lead one to think of the latest in cutting edge mapping technology, satellite imagery, or ground penetrating radar. Presently, there is hardly a corner of the world left to be discovered by the naked eye and wandering feet, rather we are uncovering the world anew in layers – what lies below this, or above that – making our maps deeper.

With the influx of this technology, maps are more complex, detailed, interconnected, and accessible. They are an embedded encyclopedia of culture. A future archeologist would just have to find one thumb drive full of GIS maps to learn the most relevant things about the society – how it retrieved its water and food, traveled en masse, developed its urban centers over time, and more – all in just a few gigabytes of data.

While I find this all very interesting, and an asset for our globalsociety, I am captivated by the hand-drawn and engraved maps of old, particularly those of Lewis and Clark’s expedition of 1804 -1806. There is a quality and mystery to them, as if we really can’t solve the puzzle of Earth’s surface; all we can do is approximate it before and unti the landscape shifts yet again.    I’m also interested in utilizing the oldest mapping equipment around – our brains – to make these places come alive. When I’m working on these pieces, every group of stitches represents an elevation or depression, and I enjoy daydreaming of the contours and deciding how steep the hills and valleys should be, and whether there will be subtle erosion or drastic alterations to the land. There is another reality that comes to being with each group of swooping stitches, the story of the landscape becoming clearer with every pass of the needle through the surface.

 Mostly, my stories tell of glacial activity. I live near the LoessHills of Iowa, which are composed of a very unique soil created by moving glaciers. It’s quite a stretch of the imagination to first try to envision the scale of the glaciers that once resided right next door and covered miles of the surface, and second to then envision those gargantuan chunks of ice sliding, grinding, and crunching over the land.

HINDS GALLERY: Brian Weber Photography

Born and raised in Nebraska, artist-photographer Brian Weber has been admiring this beautiful state, armed with his camera, for over 20 years. Brian has been constantly looking through the lens trying to capture God’s amazing moments in time.

     With only an Associate Degree in Fine Art, Brian has been virtually a self-taught photographer surrounding himself with how-to books and hundreds of magazines. Some of his best lessons although have been from relationships he has developed over the years as a member of the Fremont Area Art Association. Brian did an exhibit titled “Double Exposure” with the well-known outdoor photographer, Roy Farris, at Gallery 92 West in 2004.

     Another great mentor in Brian’s encounters as a member of the FAAA was Jack Schirmer. Over the years, many of the Awards of Excellence that Brian’s photos have received as a member of the Association of Nebraska Art Club, have come by the assistance of Jack Schirmer.

Most recently at this year’s ANAC selection show, Brian had two photos receive an Award of Excellence which then went on to the 53rd Annual ANAC Conference in York, NE. His photo titled, Spring Reflection 16 received a Certificate of Excellence at this show. Also, this year Brian’s photo Yankee Ped 10 was selected from over 800 photos submitted from all 93 Nebraska counties to represent Dodge County in the Hildegard Center for the Arts “Bridges” traveling exhibit during the 2017 Sesquicentennial year.

Brian encourages us all this month to explore the Gallery 92 West and see what he’s been “Looking at through the Lens…”